Body Talk @ The Schomburg Center

Join lesbian writers Cheryl Clarke, Pamela Sneed and Linda Villarosa, for an exciting evening of readings from their latest works, and a preview of upcoming projects. Clarke is co-editor of To Be Left With the Body and the author of The Days of Good Looks. Sneed, whose previous work includes Imagine Being More Afraid of Freedom than Slavery, will read from her upcoming work, KONG. Villarosa will read from her first book of fiction, Passing for Black. A book signing will follow the presentation with light refreshments.

TBLWTB Clarke and Fullwood Interview with Herukhuti at Blackfunk.org

HERU: Why this book and why now, both for you and for the world?

STEVEN: TO BE LEFT WITH THE BODY is the third in a series of books created by and for Black gay men produced by AIDS Project Los Angeles as a creative way to address HIV risk.

That said, the book is both nostalgic and magical for me, a grateful return to the first editing job I ever had. My experience with Colin Robinson, formerly the Executive Director of New York State Black Gay Network, and George Ayala, then the outreach educator/coordinator from APLA, taught me how to collaborate with editors and writers, solicit work from artists and to dedicate myself to the process. Working with Colin, George and the writers in Think Again was a critical step toward opening my own press a year later. I thank George and specifically Pato Hebert, who helmed the project for APLA, for allowing me this space to create and refine my thinking about the endless possibilities in doing HIV outreach to Black gay men. Both men were open to new things and continuously strive to do their work in creative, profound ways. It was a joy to work with Pato on this project because his vision and talents are expansive. Not only did he design the book, he also gave Cheryl and I space to imagine this project without limiting us. All we had to do is hit our deadlines. Check out his work on the countless APLA publications online at apla.org.

CHERYL: Thank you, Heru, for doing this interview. Actually, I got introduced to the publications of AIDS Project Los Angeles with Vol.4, Issue 1 of CORPUS, edited by Alex Juhasz in 2006, in which I published an article on Black Gay Writing. That particular issue explored women’s relationships with HIV+ men.